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Design and Implementation of Mapping Software: Developing Technology and Geography Skills in Two Different Learning Communities Article

, New Jersey Institute of Technology, United States ; , Little Bytes, United States ; , New Jersey Institute of Technology, United States

ITCE Volume 2002, Number 1, ISSN 1522-8185 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

A software development collaboration project designed to maximize the skill sets and interests of school children and teachers, educational software technologists and researchers, and college undergraduates is presented. The work brings elementary school children with college seniors and technology consultants to implement a problem-solving methodology within a collaborative environment to design, develop, and implement a multimedia software application that enhances time and space orientation abilities of children and puts the programming, interface design, and multimedia systems capabilities of college students into action. This project-based learning offers students the opportunity to learn mapping skills, problem-solving techniques, and participatory design while planning and conducting virtual tours of their city.

Citation

Friedman, R.S., Drakes, J. & Deek, F.P. (2002). Design and Implementation of Mapping Software: Developing Technology and Geography Skills in Two Different Learning Communities. Information Technology in Childhood Education Annual, 2002(1), 277-294. Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 18, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Novice and Expert Collaboration in Educational Software Development: Evaluating Application Effectiveness

    Rob Friedman & Adam Saponara, New Jersey Institute of Technology, United States

    Journal of Interactive Learning Research Vol. 19, No. 2 (April 2008) pp. 271–292

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