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Creating Electronic Learning Environments: Games, Flow, and the User Interface
PROCEEDINGS

Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

A difficult task in creating rich, exploratory interactive learning environments is building an environment that is truly engaging. Engagement can be defined as the nexus of intrinsic knowledge and/or interest and external stimuli that promote the initial interest in, and continued use of a computer-based learning environment. Complete and total involvement in a given task is described by Csikszentmihalyi's Flow Theory. Flow Theory defines the difference between enjoyment and pleasure; an optimal experience is more of a manifestation of the former. The following elements of flow are manifested in computer games and learning environments: (1) task that can be completed; (2) ability to concentrate on task; (3) task has clear goals; (4) task provides immediate feedback; (5) deep but effortless involvement; (6) exercising a sense of control over actions; (7) concern for self disappears during flow, but sense of self is stronger after flow activity; and (8) sense of duration of time is altered. The quality of multimedia assets such as images, sounds, and animations, are a key factor in interesting users in a computer game; this is an important issue in the design and development of educational software. A table shows the relationships among flow, games, and design of computer-based learning environments. Contains 14 references. (AEF)

Citation

Jones, M.G. (1998). Creating Electronic Learning Environments: Games, Flow, and the User Interface. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved September 20, 2020 from .

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