You are here:

Foundations for Creating Effective Two-Way Audio/Video Distance Education Environments
PROCEEDINGS

,

Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between students' perceptions of the two-way audio/video classroom and their anxiety, as well as their satisfaction with their distance learning experience. Students (n=222) in 12 two-way audio/video distance classes at two major midwestern universities and two midwestern community colleges completed inventories that measured their anxiety in the distance situation, satisfaction with learning in the distance environment, and perception of key elements in the two-way audio/video learning environment. Environmental variables were subdivided into perceptions of the physical environment, the physical layout, and the management of the distance learning environment. The data collected for each measure were correlated, and step-wise regression analyses were run. The findings indicate that there is a positive relationship between students' anxiety in the distance situation, their satisfaction with learning in the distance environment, and their perception of key elements in the two-way audio/video learning environment. In addition, key elements of the environment explain a significant portion of the variances of student anxiety in the environment and student satisfaction with the learning experience. Results of data analysis are presented in table form, and recommendations for further research are included. (Contains 24 references.) (DLS)

Citation

Reinhart, J. & Schneider, P. (1998). Foundations for Creating Effective Two-Way Audio/Video Distance Education Environments. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved February 21, 2020 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 18, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords