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Course Design Strategies--Traditional versus On-line. What Transfers? What Doesn't?
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American Association for Adult and Continuing Education Annual Meeting,

Abstract

Although the "basics" of program planning and instructional delivery in traditional face-to-face settings are a good place for instructors to begin when developing online courses, they are only a beginning. When one educator was faced with the task of designing an online course for inclusion in a distance masters degree program for learners across Canada, she obtained help from the first group of students to take the course. By communicating with her students throughout the course, she was able to determine what students gain and lose from online versus traditional instruction. She organized what she learned by Berge's four roles for facilitators of online courses: pedagogical, social, managerial, and technical. Among her suggestions are the following: structure learning goals, assignments, and online discussions clearly; use public and private messages to engage in feedback on all goals and assignments; bring students together face to face once before the course; incorporate threaded discussion features and chat rooms into the course design; address commitment of time and encourage all students to make the commitment; get students online and practicing at least a few weeks before the course; and use complementary distance technologies (video, audio, telephone) when possible. (Contains 21 references.) (MN)

Citation

Hutton, S. (1999). Course Design Strategies--Traditional versus On-line. What Transfers? What Doesn't?. Presented at American Association for Adult and Continuing Education Annual Meeting 1999. Retrieved October 13, 2019 from .

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