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Interaction Evokes Reflection: Learning Efficiency in Spatial Visualization
PROCEEDINGS

, State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Norfolk, VA USA ISBN 978-1-880094-42-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Different levels of interaction in a computer game-like situation were compared as means of learning efficiency on an internet-based spatial visualization task, involving polyomino puzzles. 109 undergraduates were divided among three treatment groups: pilots, who interactively attempted to solve the puzzles; consultants, who watched and talked with pilots without interacting; and co-pilots, who alternated between pilot and consultant roles every 40 seconds, and collaborated. Participants were pre-tested before and post-tested after engaging in the experiment. Repeated measures analyses showed pilots and copilots learned more than consultants. Differences were significant at 0.05. Copilots learned most. These results suggest that alternating between interaction and observation is the best way to learn spatial visualization.

Citation

Smith, G. (2001). Interaction Evokes Reflection: Learning Efficiency in Spatial Visualization. In C. Montgomerie & J. Viteli (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2001--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1755-1760). Norfolk, VA USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 16, 2019 from .

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