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The Evolution of Qualitative and Quantitative Research Classes when Delivered via Distance Education
PROCEEDINGS

,

American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting,

Abstract

This study examined whether new streamed Internet audio and video technology could be used for primary instruction in off-campus research classes. Several different off-campus student cohorts at Illinois State university enrolled in both a fall semester qualitative research methods class and a spring semester quantitative research methods class. Both classes combined asynchronous web-based materials with synchronous audio and video transmissions. Both courses used a combination of Real Media's Real Encoder and Real Player technology (for transmitting the audio and video components of the live class from the instructor to the remote students) and real-time chat and discussion group software (for bi-direction typewritten interaction between the remote students and the instructor). Both courses demonstrated that it was possible to deliver even highly technical research-oriented courses over the Internet using streaming audio and video technologies. However, both courses also encountered several critical problems and issues, such as a sense of disconnection from the group by distance students and added time pressures for instructors. (Contains 18 references.) (Author/DB)

Citation

Hecht, J.B. & Klass, P.H. (1999). The Evolution of Qualitative and Quantitative Research Classes when Delivered via Distance Education. Presented at American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting 1999. Retrieved September 19, 2020 from .

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