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Considerations of Learning and Learning Research: Revisiting the “Media Effects” Debate
Article

, , University of Colorado, United States

Journal of Interactive Learning Research Volume 12, Number 1, ISSN 1093-023X Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This article revisits the "Media Effects" debate-whether media, in and of itself, affects learning-and presents an analysis of the various arguments from a learning theory per-spective. Whether one agrees with a particular position is of lesser importance than the knowledge gained from analyzing each position. One outcome of this analysis is that some of the strongest contestants, namely, Clark (the skeptic) and Kozma (the advocate), may actually be in agreement about instructional support and instructional design. However, there are substantive disagreements when we look at the po-sitions contestants hold on learning and knowing. These dif-ferences point to fundamentally different epistemologies, and ultimately suggest different views of the role of instruc-tional media and method, the learner, and the instructor with-in a learning environment. The stance one takes on learning leads to different responses to the media effects question, and has profound implications for the types of research, instruc-tional design, and assessment questions that one is committed to. As an alternative, a dynamic process of instructional design is proposed where assessments are aimed at instructional prac-tices as well as learning outcomes, and instructional media and method are mutually constitutive and modifiable in response to learner and instructional outcomes.

Citation

ROBINSON, C. & NATHAN, M. (2001). Considerations of Learning and Learning Research: Revisiting the “Media Effects” Debate. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 12(1), 69-88. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 16, 2019 from .

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