You are here:

Girls teach themselves, and boys too: Peer learning in a computer-based design and construction activity
ARTICLE

, ,

Computers & Education Volume 29, Number 1, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the use of female students as peer experts in a workshop introducing an interactive, computer-based learning environment called LEGO/Logo. In LEGO/Logo, children design, construct and program computer-controllable machines using specialized parts such as motors, sound elements, and sensors. The eighty-five students who participated in the study attended 6th grade (age 12) at a middle-class elementary school in the United States. The LEGO/Logo workshops were approximately 15 hours each, and the students worked primarily in pairs or groups of three. The findings indicate that the students were successful in building a wide range of LEGO/Logo machines, from simple to complex models, and that the peer teachers were utilized as experts by the other students and benefited from this experience. Certain gender-related differences were observed in the students' interactions and in working with the LEGO/Logo system.

Citation

Edwards, L.D., Coddington, A. & Caterina, D. (1997). Girls teach themselves, and boys too: Peer learning in a computer-based design and construction activity. Computers & Education, 29(1), 33-48. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved August 22, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 30, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0360-1315(97)00018-3

Keywords

Cited By

View References & Citations Map

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.