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The Application for Hand-written Recognition in order to Search on Electric KANJI Dictionaries for Non-Japanese Learners
PROCEEDINGS

, , , Waseda Univ., Japan ; , Univ. of Tokyo Foreign Language, Japan ; , Waseda Univ., Japan

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Norfolk, VA USA ISBN 978-1-880094-42-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Due to increasing internationalization, more and more people are trying to learn Japanese. In spite of a lingering recession, Japan has a strong influence in economic and technology areas. Many students in the Asia region or other countries learn Japanese as a foreign language. Also in Japan, a considerable number of students from overseas have been studying Japanese. For people speaking one of India-European language family, the Japanese language is one of the most difficult languages to master. Especially it is much harder for Japanese beginners to use a Kanji dictionary than for English beginners to look up a word on an English dictionary. An English word can be found through the knowledge of 26 letters of the English alphabet and its order however, to search for Kanji on a dictionary is not as simple. There are three keys for looking up a Kanji character. These are; "reading" or "number of strokes" or "root". They are all too hard for Japanese beginners to know. Hand-written recognition systems used on PDA or others are designed for Japanese. Most of them attach importance to stroke order for the purpose of realization of better correctness and high-speed recognition. It is useful for native Japanese and middle or higher-level Japanese learners. However, for Japanese beginners, it is difficult to write unfamiliar Kanji characters in the right stroke order. This paper provides a new method for looking up a Kanji on an electric dictionary by using handwriting recognition for Japanese beginners.

Citation

Fujita, S., Yamada, K., Iida, K., Lin, C. & Narita, S. (2001). The Application for Hand-written Recognition in order to Search on Electric KANJI Dictionaries for Non-Japanese Learners. In C. Montgomerie & J. Viteli (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2001--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 523-524). Norfolk, VA USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 17, 2019 from .

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