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Children's Learning Strategies, Encoding Processes, and Navigational Decisions in a Hypermedia Concept Lesson
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Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1996 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology,

Abstract

High ability, highly verbal fifth grade students (n=12) were studied, by employing think aloud protocols, to identify students' use of learning strategies, encoding processes, and navigational decisions in a hypermedia lesson on propaganda techniques. Subjects were asked to read and think aloud as they worked their way through the concept lesson and immediate posttest. These "think alouds" were transcribed and coded for analysis. Results revealed a wide variation in amount and type of learning strategies used by students with high, average, and low test scores. Navigational decisions and encoding processes also varied widely among the students. High test scorers (n=4) tended to use more varied learning strategies and were more consistent in their navigation decisions than the other two groups. The high group used a combination of strategies: comprehension monitoring, elaboration, and rehearsal. The low test scoring group (n=5) used some of the same strategies, but used them to a lesser degree and with more errors or faulty construction. The average group (n=3) tended to use a greater combination of strategies than the other two groups.(Contains 28 references.) (Author/SWC)

Citation

Davidson-Shivers, G.V. (1997). Children's Learning Strategies, Encoding Processes, and Navigational Decisions in a Hypermedia Concept Lesson. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1996 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1997. Retrieved November 17, 2019 from .

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