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Self-Efficacy Beliefs as an Indicator of Teachers' Preparedness for Teaching with Technology
PROCEEDINGS

, University of Southern Queensland, Australia

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, ISBN 978-1-880094-33-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The focus on information technology in education has shifted towards curriculum
integration. Consequently teacher education programs need to prepare graduates for teaching
with IT. Graduates should possess both skills in the use of IT and belief in their capacity to
integrate IT into teaching. Decisions about course design might be informed by a measure that
is directly influenced by course changes and also indicates likely long term outcomes for
teacher behavior. Self-efficacy beliefs can provide such a measure especially in the context of
preparing teachers to teach with technology.

Citation

Albion, P.R. (1999). Self-Efficacy Beliefs as an Indicator of Teachers' Preparedness for Teaching with Technology. In J. Price, J. Willis, D. Willis, M. Jost & S. Boger-Mehall (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 1999--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1602-1608). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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