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Self-Regulation during Computer Skills Learning: The Influence of Goals and Self-Evaluation
PROCEEDINGS

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American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting,

Abstract

This study examined the effects of goals--such as denoting learning and performance outcomes--and self-evaluation on the acquisition of computer skills, efficacy in performing computer tasks, perception of competence for the use of self-regulatory strategies, and frequency of strategy use while learning computer skills. Subjects were 44 college students enrolled in an "Introduction to Computers in Education" course. Subjects' learning goal was the use of specific HyperCard tasks, and their performance goal was to do their best at the tasks. Results showed that when goals are combined with self-evaluation of progress, the students' perception of efficacy and competency for the use of self-regulatory strategies when learning computer skills was raised, and the frequency of strategy use increased. This combination, however, did not lead to a significant increase in other outcome measures. There were no definite results for self-evaluation. (AS)

Citation

Ertmer, P.A. & Schunk, D.H. (1997). Self-Regulation during Computer Skills Learning: The Influence of Goals and Self-Evaluation. Presented at American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting 1997. Retrieved June 26, 2019 from .

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