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Some Concerns About the Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) and Technology
PROCEEDINGS

, Georgia Southern University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, ISBN 978-1-880094-33-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) originally proposed by Hall & Hord (1987) and modified by Bailey and Palsha (1992) provided a conceptual framework for the study discussed (Slough, 1998). According to the model, as innovations—in this case telecommunications technology—are implemented, individuals progress through a typical set of concerns that are progressive and to some extent sequential; and progress in one innovation does not always transfer to the newest innovation (Hall & Hord, 1987). In general, the basic assumptions of CBAM were supported by this study. Teachers at different stages of the implementation of telecommunications did have different concerns; and further, teachers at similar stages of implementations did have similar concerns. Two noted short-comings of CBAM discussed in this paper are that CBAM assumes a static innovation and that all individuals progress to adoption of the innovation.

Citation

Slough, S.W. (1999). Some Concerns About the Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) and Technology. In J. Price, J. Willis, D. Willis, M. Jost & S. Boger-Mehall (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 1999--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1949-1953). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 25, 2020 from .

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