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The Effectiveness of Cooperative Learning for Low- and High-Achieving Students Using an Integrated Learning System
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Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1996 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology,

Abstract

In recent years, many schools have turned to Integrated Learning Systems (ILSs) to facilitate instruction and assist with raising state standardized test scores. Typically, these ILSs are utilized in a computer lab with students working individually on computer-based instructional lessons for an allotted time period. Using ILSs in this manner has created problems such as increasing anxiety, hostility, and boredom in students. Through the integration of cooperative learning with ILS delivery, some of these problems could be alleviated. This study examined achievement and behavior differences between elementary school students completing ILS activities in a traditional, individualized format, and students completing the same activities in cooperative learning groups. This was in order to determine if a cooperative learning model could be used effectively with students completing mathematics activities in a lab-based ILS. In addition, this study aimed to discern if the cooperative strategy was more effective for students with high or low academic ability levels. Achievement and attitudinal data were collected for all fifth grade students in the selected school prior to the experiment and at the end of the treatment period. Results revealed that students using an ILS for mathematics instruction performed better on standardized tests and that attitudes were more positive when they completed the computer activities in cooperative groups. (Contains 38 references.) (Author/AEF)

Citation

Brush, T.A. (1996). The Effectiveness of Cooperative Learning for Low- and High-Achieving Students Using an Integrated Learning System. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1996 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1996. Retrieved October 19, 2019 from .

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