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Adapting Instruction to Individual Learner Differences: A Research Paradigm for Computer-Based Instruction
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Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1994 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

This paper examines a research paradigm that is particularly suited to experimentation-related computer-based instruction and integrated learning systems. The main assumption of the model is that one of the most powerful capabilities of computer-based instruction, and specifically of integrated learning systems, is the capacity to adapt instruction to the individual differences that exist among learners. The model is applied to an instructional treatment through a popular integrated learning system from Computer Curriculum Corporation (CCC). The problem of adaptive instruction is to diagnose, in any group of learners, where each is located in relation to individual learning characteristics and the knowledge and performances required at a given point in instruction. The research paradigm to be applied uses a microanalysis technique, based on a regression model proposed by previous researchers, that operationalized variables for each individual. Three figures illustrate the model and discussion. (Contains 49 references.) (SLD)

Citation

Mills, S.C. & Ragan, T.J. (1994). Adapting Instruction to Individual Learner Differences: A Research Paradigm for Computer-Based Instruction. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1994 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1994. Retrieved October 17, 2019 from .

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