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What Middle School Educators Should Know about Assistive Technology and Universal Design for Learning
ARTICLE

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Middle School Journal Volume 40, Number 4, ISSN 0094-0771

Abstract

In the new millennium, the No Child Left Behind Act (2001) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) (2004) ask educators to maximize opportunities for students with disabilities to succeed in inclusive classrooms. To make autonomy and integration seamless, many students with special needs will need to make use of assistive technology. Most middle school general educators are familiar with computer-enhanced instruction and the use of technology for research projects, presentations, and interactive learning software. As teachers restructure to meet the demand for equitable education for all students (No Child Left Behind, 2001), Universal Design for Learning becomes an important tool. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is research-based model for curricular design that ensures participation in the general educational program of all students, including those with disabilities (Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST), 2007). This article discusses what middle school educators should know about assistive technology and UDL. (Contains 2 figures.)

Citation

Zascavage, V. & Winterman, K.G. (2009). What Middle School Educators Should Know about Assistive Technology and Universal Design for Learning. Middle School Journal, 40(4), 46-52. Retrieved September 16, 2019 from .

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