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Differences in Self-Regulation for Online Learning between First- and Second-Generation College Students
ARTICLE

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Research in Higher Education Volume 45, Number 1, ISSN 0361-0365

Abstract

Self-regulation is generally accepted as an important construct in student success within environments that allow learner choice, such as online courses. The purpose of the current study was to investigate differences between first- and second-generation college students' ability to self-regulate their online learning. An ANCOVA, with comfort level using the computer as a control, provided evidence that first-generation students report significantly lower levels of self-regulation for online learning than their second-generation counterparts.

Citation

Williams, P.E. & Hellman, C.M. (2004). Differences in Self-Regulation for Online Learning between First- and Second-Generation College Students. Research in Higher Education, 45(1), 71-82. Retrieved September 25, 2020 from .

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