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How Compatible Are Communities of Inquiry and the Internet? Some Concerns about the Community of Inquiry Approach to E-Learning
ARTICLE

E-Learning and Digital Media Volume 9, Number 1, ISSN 2042-7530

Abstract

There is an extensive body of literature which argues that the Internet supports student-centred learning, collaboration, community, higher-order thinking and the construction of meaning and knowledge. As such, many e-learning advocates have turned to the Community of Inquiry as an ideal pedagogy because it too shares these educational ideals. However, I argue that the Internet may actually conflict with many aspects of the Community of Inquiry, as described by Dewey and Lipman. In particular, the Internet can negate many of the attributes and skills it is assumed to promote, such as higher-order thinking, the construction of meaning and community. E-learning needs to respond to these potential problems in order to develop pedagogies and curricula that can counter them. The author suggests that Philosophy for Children may provide the basis for such a pedagogy and curriculum. (Contains 1 note.)

Citation

Bleazby, J. (2012). How Compatible Are Communities of Inquiry and the Internet? Some Concerns about the Community of Inquiry Approach to E-Learning. E-Learning and Digital Media, 9(1), 1-12. Retrieved October 14, 2019 from .

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