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An Empirical Study of Personal Response Technology for Improving Attendance and Learning in a Large Class
ARTICLE

Journal of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Volume 9, Number 1, ISSN 1527-9316

Abstract

Student evaluations of a large General Psychology course indicate that students enjoy the class a great deal, yet attendance is low. An experiment was conducted to evaluate a personal response system as a solution. Attendance rose by 30% as compared to extra credit as an inducement, but was equivalent to offering pop quizzes. Performance on test items targeted by in-class questions rose by an average of 21% while control test questions rose by only 3%. The effect is seen in both factual and conceptual test items. Two theories that may explain the effect are discussed. (Contains 2 figures and 3 footnotes.)

Citation

Shapiro, A. (2009). An Empirical Study of Personal Response Technology for Improving Attendance and Learning in a Large Class. Journal of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 9(1), 13-26. Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. Crossing borders: A comparison of the impact various teaching strategies and tools in an online and face-to-face psychology course.

    Kenneth Berry & Lena Paulo Kushnir, University of Toronto, Canada

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2013 (Jun 24, 2013) pp. 1724–1731

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