You are here:

"MSN Was the next Big Thing after Beanie Babies": Children's Virtual Experiences as an Interface to Their Identities and Their Everyday Lives
ARTICLE

E-Learning Volume 3, Number 2, ISSN 1741-8887

Abstract

In this article the author explores the seamlessness between children's online and offline worlds. For children, there is no dichotomy of online and offline, or virtual and real; the digital is so much intertwined into their lives and psyche that the one is entirely enmeshed with the other. Despite early research pointing to the differences that mark the virtual as a space of "otherness", the author suggests that the fabric of children's everyday lives knows no such distinct demarcation, and that what they do in their virtual worlds significantly affects how they connect to society. Moreover, through the virtual, children are simultaneously engaging in acts of self-reflection, self-fashioning and identity formation. Using data from a longitudinal ethnographic study of children online, the author illuminates a number of case studies which support this argument. She does this by using narrative accounts based on extensive interviews with the children. (Contains 1 note and 3 figures.)

Citation

Thomas, A. (2006). "MSN Was the next Big Thing after Beanie Babies": Children's Virtual Experiences as an Interface to Their Identities and Their Everyday Lives. E-Learning, 3(2), 126-142. Retrieved November 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 19, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords