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“No significant distance” between face-to-face and online instruction: evidence from principles of economics
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Economics of Education Review Volume 23, Number 5, ISSN 0272-7757 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This paper describes an experiment focused on measuring and explaining differences in students learning between online and face-to-face modes of instruction in college level principles of economics courses. Our results indicate that students in face-to-face sections scored better on the Test of Understanding College Economics (TUCE) than students in online sections. We find that failure to account for the self-selection of students into online or face-to-face sections biases toward zero the differential in TUCE scores between online and face-to-face students. Online students score a statistically significant 3–6 fewer correct answers, out of 33 questions, than face-to-face students in the selection-corrected model. However, an endogenous switching model finds that students who select into the online classes perform better than they would, all other things constant, in a face-to-face class. Other results suggest caution in using the web to teach underclassmen.

Citation

Coates, D., Humphreys, B., Kane, J. & Vachris, M. (2004). “No significant distance” between face-to-face and online instruction: evidence from principles of economics. Economics of Education Review, 23(5), 533-546. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved November 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Economics of Education Review on April 18, 2013. Economics of Education Review is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/detail?accno=EJ730384

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