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The Studio Experience at the University of Georgia: An Example of Constructionist Learning for Adults
ARTICLE

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Educational Technology Research and Development Volume 58, Number 6, ISSN 1042-1629

Abstract

The Studio curriculum in the Learning, Design, and Technology (formerly Instructional Technology) program at a large research-extensive university in the southeastern U.S. represents a deliberate application of contemporary theory of how adults learn complex information in ill-structured domains. The Studio curriculum, part of a graduate program leading to a master's degree, has been implemented since 1998 to prepare professionals to design, develop, evaluate, and manage educational multimedia. Theoretical considerations played a major role in shaping the design of the Studio curriculum. Prominent among these were constructionism, situated cognition/situated learning, and self-directed learning. Important related theoretical constructs included scaffolding and flow theory. This paper describes the Studio learning environment, presents these theoretical concepts, and discusses the application of theory to practice in the training of adults in instructional design and development (IDD). (Contains 1 footnote, 3 tables, and 2 figures.)

Citation

Clinton, G. & Rieber, L.P. (2010). The Studio Experience at the University of Georgia: An Example of Constructionist Learning for Adults. Educational Technology Research and Development, 58(6), 755-780. Retrieved June 26, 2019 from .

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