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Connecting schools, community, and family with ICT: Four-year trends related to school level and SES of public schools in Florida
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Computers & Education Volume 55, Number 1, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Community and family involvement in schools is a well-documented antecedent to student success; yet, educators often find it challenging to increase involvement with parents and members of diverse communities. One solution is to use information and communication technology (ICT) as a bridge between schools, families, and the community. This research first presents a conceptual framework for uniting schools, families, and community members using ICT and then uses statewide data collected in Florida from the 2003–2004 to 2006–2007 school years to investigate significant trends in how schools communicate with, involve, and provide ICT access and education for community and family members. Results were analyzed at each school level, as well as by the differences between high and low socio-economic status (SES) schools. Findings indicate that during the study schools at every level and SES group significantly increased their contributions for ICT access and education of families and communities. However, high schools serving the most economically advantaged students provided the most ICT contributions to their families and communities. On the other hand, in support of bridging the digital divide, low SES elementary and middle schools provided significantly more contributions for ICT access and education of their community and parents, than their high SES counterparts. Recommendations and implications are provided.

Citation

Hohlfeld, T.N., Ritzhaupt, A.D. & Barron, A.E. (2010). Connecting schools, community, and family with ICT: Four-year trends related to school level and SES of public schools in Florida. Computers & Education, 55(1), 391-405. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved November 11, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 29, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.02.004

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