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An Argument for Clarity: What Are Learning Management Systems, What Are They Not, and What Should They Become?
ARTICLE

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TLRPTIL Volume 51, Number 2, ISSN 8756-3894

Abstract

The application of computers to education has a history dating back to the 1950s, well before the pervasive spread of personal computers (Reiser, 1987). With a mature history and varying approaches to utilizing computers for education, a veritable alphabet soup of terms and acronyms related to computers in education have found their way into the literature, most of them non-standardized. Learning Management System (LMS) is one approach to the application of computers to education which holds great potential and important concepts, yet is often misunderstood and the term misused. This article will clarify the use of the term LMS by presenting a history and definition of LMS, differentiating it from similar terms with which it is often confused, and discussing the role it can play in education. It will then describe current application and available features of LMS's, and conclude by identifying trends and recommending future research. (Contains 1 table.)

Citation

Watson, W.R. & Watson, S.L. (2007). An Argument for Clarity: What Are Learning Management Systems, What Are They Not, and What Should They Become?. TechTrends: Linking Research and Practice to Improve Learning, 51(2), 28-34. Retrieved December 16, 2019 from .

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