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Integrating Technology to Foster Inquiry in an Elementary Science Methods Course: A Case Study of One Teacher Educator’s Initiatives in a PT3 Project
Article

, , Purdue University, United States

JCMST Volume 25, Number 2, ISSN 0731-9258 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

ABSTRACT Prospective teachers and teacher educators both confront practical and philosophical issues in attempting to integrate technology into their practice. This paper describes a case study of a science teacher educator, a novice with instructional technology, who integrated technology into an elementary science methods course, with the support of a PT3 implementation project. The science teacher educator, through action research, examined her own knowledge and practice while simultaneously helping her students, pre-service teachers, develop their own practice. Qualitative analysis of classroom observations, field notes, student feedback forms, and other documents revealed themes related to technology's role in inquiry, external and internal factors affecting the faculty member's development, and pre-service teachers' development of expertise and willingness to use technology themselves. Pre-service teachers' growth and development related to technology integration parallels that of teacher educator's.

Citation

Capobianco, B. & Lehman, J. (2006). Integrating Technology to Foster Inquiry in an Elementary Science Methods Course: A Case Study of One Teacher Educator’s Initiatives in a PT3 Project. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 25(2), 123-146. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 12, 2018 from .

Keywords

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