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Online Learning as Information Delivery: Digital Myopia Article

, University of Wollongong, Australia ; , University of Georgia, United States ; , Edith Cowan University, Australia

Journal of Interactive Learning Research Volume 16, Number 4, ISSN 1093-023X Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Invited as a paper from ED-MEDIA 2004

In business and commerce, the concept of marketing myopia has been a useful tool to predict, analyze and explain the rise and fall of businesses. In this article, we question whether the concept can also be used to predict the ultimate downfall of online learning in higher education, if universities continue to confuse their key mission – education – with the much more product-oriented aim of information delivery. The proliferation of information-based online courses is examined within the context of the limitations imposed by widely used course management systems, institutional impediments and other factors that encourage teachers to adopt information delivery in preference for more innovative, authentic pedagogies. Data and findings are reported from teachers and instructional designers who have been successful in offering complex and sustained tasks online.

Citation

Herrington, J., Reeves, T.C. & Oliver, R. (2005). Online Learning as Information Delivery: Digital Myopia. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 16(4), 353-367. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 14, 2018 from .

Keywords

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    Australasian Journal of Educational Technology Vol. 29, No. 3 (Jul 17, 2013)

  2. Assimilating Online Technologies into School Culture

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    Interdisciplinary Journal of E-Learning and Learning Objects Vol. 5, No. 1 (Jan 01, 2009) pp. 307–334

  3. Does Developing Online Tasks draw Teachers nearer to Interrelated Knowledge (TPACK)?

    Anat Oster-Levinz & Aviva Klieger, Beit-Berl College, Israel

    Global Learn 2011 (Mar 28, 2011) pp. 696–701

  4. A Case Study of Online Situated Learning – Educating Using an Enterprise Resource Planning Application

    Richard Fulford, Edith Cowan University, Australia

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2008 (Jun 30, 2008) pp. 5218–5222

  5. Educating with an information system - the good, the bad and the ugly

    Richard Fulford, Edith Cowan University, Australia

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2009 (Jun 22, 2009) pp. 359–365

  6. 3D Online Spaces for Teacher Education: Mapping the Territory

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    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2008 (Mar 03, 2008) pp. 1606–1612

  7. Enhancing Case-Based Learning in Teacher Education Through Online Discussions: Structure and Facilitation

    Katherine Mitchem, California University of Pennsylvania, United States; Gail Fitzgerald, University of Missouri-Columbia, United States; Candice Hollingsead, Bethel College, United States; Kevin Koury, California University of Pennsylvania, United States; Kevin Miller, Buffalo State University, United States; Hui-Hsien Tsai, University of Missouri-Columbia, United States

    Journal of Interactive Learning Research Vol. 19, No. 2 (April 2008) pp. 331–349

  8. How Can Hybrid Courses Designed with Socio-Constructivist Design-Principles Promote Learning in Higher Education?

    Yael Kali, Rachel Levin-Peled & Yehudit Judy Dori, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Israel

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2007 (Oct 15, 2007) pp. 6071–6078

  9. Comparing Two Online Learning Environments: A Classroom of One or Many?

    Priscilla Norton & Dawn Hathaway, George Mason University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2007 (Mar 26, 2007) pp. 2064–2071

  10. Authentic E-Learning in Higher Education: Design Principles for Authentic Learning Environments and Tasks

    Jan Herrington, University of Wollongong, Australia

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2006 (October 2006) pp. 3164–3173

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