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Equations with Parameters: A Locus Approach
Article

, State University of New York at Potsdam, United States ; , Indiana University, United States

JCMST Volume 25, Number 1, ISSN 0731-9258 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This paper introduces technology-based teaching ideas that facilitate the development of qualitative reasoning techniques in the context of quadratic equations with parameters. It reflects on activities designed for prospective secondary mathematics teachers in accord with standards for teaching and recommendations for teachers in North America. The main educational implications of proposed didactics include the emphasis on the geometrization of algebra, emergence of residual mental power that can be used in the absence of technology, and development of skills in problem posing.

Citation

Abramovich, S. & Norton, A. (2006). Equations with Parameters: A Locus Approach. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 25(1), 5-28. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 25, 2019 from .

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