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Implications of Ubiquitous Computing for the Social Studies Curriculum
ARTICLE

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Journal of Computing in Teacher Education Volume 20, Number 3, ISSN 1040-2454

Abstract

In March 2002, members of the National Technology Leadership Initiative (NTLI) met in Charlottesville, Virginia to discuss the potential effects of ubiquitous computing on the field of education. Ubiquitous computing, or "on-demand availability of task-necessary computing power," involves providing every student with a handheld computer--a situation with enormous repercussions for education and teacher education. Over a two-day period, participants engaged in intensive discussion of the issue of ubiquitous computing and developed seven conclusions. This paper, written by the representatives from social studies organizations, seeks to examine the specific implications of these seven conclusions for the field of social studies education. The paper discusses the concept of ubiquitous computing and the impact this technology shift may have on social studies curricula, teacher preparation, software development, and research agendas.

Citation

van Hover, S.D., Berson, M.J., Bolick, C.M. & Swan, K.O. (2004). Implications of Ubiquitous Computing for the Social Studies Curriculum. Journal of Computing in Teacher Education, 20(3), 107-111. Retrieved October 16, 2019 from .

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