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Programming by Choice: Urban Youth Learning Programming with Scratch
PROCEEDINGS

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SIGCSE Annual Meeting,

Abstract

This paper describes Scratch, a visual, block-based programming language designed to facilitate media manipulation for novice programmers. We report on the Scratch programming experiences of urban youth ages 8-18 at a Computer Clubhouse–an after school center–over an 18-month period. Our analyses of 536 Scratch projects collected during this time documents the learning of key programming concepts even in the absence of instructional interventions or experienced mentors. We discuss the motivations of urban youth who choose to program in Scratch rather than using one of the many other software packages available to them and the implications for introducing programming at after school settings in under served communities.

Citation

Maloney, J., Peppler, K., Kafai, Y.B., Resnick, M. & Rusk, N. (2008). Programming by Choice: Urban Youth Learning Programming with Scratch. Presented at SIGCSE Annual Meeting 2008. Retrieved February 18, 2019 from .

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