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Instructional Technologist as a Coach: Impact of a Situated Professional Development Program on Teachers’ Technology Use Article

, East Carolina University, United States

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 13, Number 4, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This article details a study that sought an alternative method
to instruct public school teachers on how to integrate technology
in their classrooms. Paired with a technology coach,
nine teachers participated in this situated professional development
technology program. Results from this technology
coach program detail successful technology coaching approaches,
activities, and skills, as well as the ability of this
coach program to enable teachers to gain confidence in using
technology in their classrooms. Details on how to best implement
a technology coach or mentor program are recommended
and a reexamination of instructional designer competencies
is proposed.

Citation

Sugar, W. (2005). Instructional Technologist as a Coach: Impact of a Situated Professional Development Program on Teachers’ Technology Use. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 13(4), 547-571. Norfolk, VA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved September 20, 2018 from .

Keywords

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