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The Evolution of a Blended Learning Instructional Approach in an Undergraduate Education Course: Findings from an Action Research Study PROCEEDINGS

, , West Chester University of Pennsylvania, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-02-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper describes the author’s adoption of a blended or hybrid learning approach in her undergraduate introductory educational psychology course. Blended learning uses a combination of online learning and face-to-face instruction. The author decided to use the approach to increase the active engagement of her students in the course material and to model the use of technology for instruction to the teacher candidates taking the course. Action research was conducted across five semesters of blended learning implementation in order to examine the effectiveness of the technique and to make instructional modifications. The findings of the action research and how they were used to guide the evolution of the learning approach are discussed.

Citation

Kenney, J. & Newcombe, E. (2013). The Evolution of a Blended Learning Instructional Approach in an Undergraduate Education Course: Findings from an Action Research Study. In R. McBride & M. Searson (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2013--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 621-626). New Orleans, Louisiana, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 17, 2018 from .

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