You are here:

Open Education Designs: A Taxonomy for Differentiating and Classifying Open Learning Environments PROCEEDINGS

, , University of South Alabama, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-02-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Open Education has seen explosive growth in the last decade and especially so in the last few years. This growth has occurred in spite of the lack of common frameworks for identifying, differentiating, and classifying open education structures and concepts. This paper presents an operational exploration of open education, differentiates between three types of openness, offers an overarching term (Open Education Designs) to identify open educational learning environments, and provides a taxonomy for differentiating and classifying Open Education Designs (OEDs).

Citation

Baker III, F.W. & Surry, D. (2013). Open Education Designs: A Taxonomy for Differentiating and Classifying Open Learning Environments. In R. McBride & M. Searson (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2013--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 189-194). New Orleans, Louisiana, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 13, 2018 from .

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Couros, A. (2009). Open, connected, social-implications for educational design. Campus-Wide Information Systems 26 (3). Retrieved from http://www.icicte.org/ICICTE2008Proceedings/couros041.pdf
  2. Drexler, W. (2010). The networked student model for construction of personal learning environments: Balancing teacher control and student autonomy. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 26(3). 369-385.
  3. Friedman, T. (2012, May 15). Come the revolution. The New York Times. The Opinion Pages. Retrieved October 2, 2012 from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/16/opinion/friedman-come-the-revolution.html?_r=0
  4. Friere, P. (1970). Pedagogy of the Oppressed. New York: Herder and Herder.
  5. Giaconia, R.M., & Hedges, L.V. (1982). Identifying features of effective open education. Review of Educational Research, 52(4), P. 579-602.
  6. Hill, B.V. (1975). What’s open about open education? In Nyberg, D. (1975). The Philosophy of Open Education (pp.3-13). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, Ltd.
  7. Instructional Ideas and Technology Tools for Online Success. (2012). Retrieved October 2, 2012 from https://www.coursesites.com/webapps/Bb-sites-course-creationBBLEARN/courseHomepage.html x?course_id=_215194_1
  8. Klein, Z., Eshel, Y. (1980). The open classroom in across-cultural perspective: A research note. Sociology of Education, 53 (April) pp. 114-121.
  9. Khan Academy. (2012). Khan Academy. Retrieved October 2, 2012 from http://www.khanacademy.org/
  10. Littlefield, J. (2012). How edX will revolutionize learning. About.com. Retrieved October 2, 2012 from http://distancelearn.about.com/od/isitforyou/a/How-Edx-Will-Revolutionize-Online-Learning.htm
  11. MOOCMOOC. (2012). Retrieved October 2, 2012 from http://moocmooc.com/
  12. Murray, P. (2012, January 28). Sebastion Thrun aims to revolutionize university education with Udacity. Singularity Hub. Retrieved October 2, 2012 from http://singularityhub.com/2012/01/28/sebastian-thrun-aims-torevolutionize-university-education-with-udacity/
  13. Salmon, F. (2012, January 31). Udacity’s Model. Reuters. Retrieved October 2, 2012 from http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/01/31/udacitys-model/
  14. Sherman, S. (2009). Haven’t We Seen This Before? Sustaining a Vision in Teacher Education for Progressive Teaching Practice. Teacher Education Quarterly, 36(4), 41-60. Retrieved from http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/EJ870214.pdf
  15. Siemens, G. (2012). MOOCs are really a platform. Elearnspace. Retrieved from http://www.elearnspace.org/blog/2012/07/25/moocs-are-really-a-platform/
  16. Tunnell, D. (1975). Open Education: an expression in search of a definition. In Nyberg, D. (1975). The Philosophy of Open Education (pp.14-23). London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, Ltd.
  17. Wiley, D. (2006). Open source, openness, and higher education. Innovate 3 (1). Retrieved from http://www.innovateonline.info/index.php?view=article & Id=354
  18. Wiley, D. (2010) Openness as a catalyst for an educational reformation. Educause Review, 45(4). Retrieved from http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/openness-catalyst-educational-reformation
  19. Weller, M. (2011). The Digital Scholar: How Technology is Transforming Scholarly Practice. USA: Bloomsbury Academic.

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.