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Computer Competencies For Teacher Educators
PROCEEDINGS

, , Boise State University

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, ISBN 978-1-880094-28-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Computers have become a part of teacher education faster than colleges of education have had time to develop a curriculum for them. Political entities are requesting that teachers be technology literate in exchange for funding; school superintendents want to hire teachers who know how to integrate computers into the teaching/learning process; and finally, many teachers themselves are asking, “What should we know?” The Idaho State Legislature has provided money for both public schools and Teacher Education Programs in the state. Idaho schools receive 10.2 million dollars per year in technology money, and the Boise State University (BSU) Teacher Education Program receives $350,000 per year to re-train 5,000 teachers in its service to use computers and other technology in the teaching/learning process. The legislators demand accountability. They want to know what teachers and students should learn to do and how long it will take. They also want to know how to evaluate teachers’ use of computer technology in the teaching/learning process. Finally, both educators and those who provide funding want to know how student performance will improve because of the influx of machines and training.

Citation

Thorsen, C.D. & Barr, R.D. (1998). Computer Competencies For Teacher Educators. In S. McNeil, J. Price, S. Boger-Mehall, B. Robin & J. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 1998--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 39-42). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 22, 2019 from .