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Learning Objects, Learning Object Repositories, and Learning Theory: Preliminary Best Practices for Online Courses
ARTICLE

, Excelsior College, United States

IJELLO Volume 1, Number 1, ISSN 1552-2237 Publisher: Informing Science Institute

Abstract

This paper evaluates current practices in the use of learning objects in online courses, reviews best practices, and suggests new approaches that incorporate learning theory. In doing so, the paper also explores the relationship between the use of learning objects and learning theory. The analysis and observations are based on surveys of existing approaches, best practices, and hands-on experience. Placing the use of learning objects within the context of constructivist epistemolo-gies is seen as pivotal to understanding how to effectively use them within online courses. In addition, it responds to the challenge of the eclectic epistemology that confronts the instructional designer, the e-learner, and the facilitator, and it provides a method for using learning objects to overcome ambiguity and barriers to student persistence in a distance learning setting. The paper discusses how to apply motivation theories to the use of learning objects and how doing so can help learners achieve outcome goals. Further, the paper addresses learner needs and limitations and discusses how learning objects can be deployed in a way that maximizes accommodation and flexibility. It discusses cases of successful and unsuccessful uses of learning objects in online learning, and proposes guidelines for best practices. Keyword: Learning objects, learning theories, repositories, online courses

Citation

Nash, S. (2005). Learning Objects, Learning Object Repositories, and Learning Theory: Preliminary Best Practices for Online Courses. Interdisciplinary Journal of E-Learning and Learning Objects, 1(1), 217-228. Informing Science Institute. Retrieved March 17, 2019 from .

Keywords

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    Interdisciplinary Journal of E-Learning and Learning Objects Vol. 7, No. 1 (Jan 01, 2011) pp. 323–338

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