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Myth busting education in a virtual world – changing demands and directions
PROCEEDINGS

, University of New England, United States ; , The University of Auckland, New Zealand ; , University of South Australia, Australia ; , University of New England, United States ; , Swinburne University of Technology, Australia ; , Southern Cross University, Australia

ASCILITE - Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Annual Conference, Publisher: Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education

Abstract

There has been much media reporting on the efficacy of virtual worlds for education over the last few years. Some of the claims made are unfounded and not based on empirical evidence. All panel members have been teaching and conducting research in virtual worlds for several years. They will address many of the myths about teaching and learning in a virtual world. The format will follow Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage’s television series, “Myth Busters” (“MythBusters,” 2011) to find out whether the myths are “founded”, “busted” or “plausible”. To date there has been limited research and publications reporting on myths surrounding the teaching and learning in virtual worlds. However, Calani (2010) attempted to resolve the myths around immersion, James (2007) set about resolving the myths surrounding business in Second Life and, Hendrich & Mesch (2009), discussed 10,000 reasons why a virtual world will or won’t work. This interactive session will seek audience participation in resolving these myths through evidence-based practice. In this symposium we will endeavour to address some of the following myths that have been perpetuated about teaching in learning over the last few years:

Citation

Gregory, S., Diener, S., Wood, D., Gregory, B., Sinnappan, S. & Jacka, L. (2011). Myth busting education in a virtual world – changing demands and directions. In Proceedings of ASCILITE - Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Annual Conference 2011 (pp. 502-503). Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education. Retrieved October 18, 2019 from .

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