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ICT literacies and the curricular conundrum of calling all complex digital technologies “Tools” ARTICLE

, , , University of British Columbia, Canada

IJEDICT Volume 4, Number 4, ISSN 1814-0556 Publisher: Open Campus, The University of the West Indies, West Indies

Abstract

ICT is widely acknowledged internationally as an emerging and increasingly important area of K-16 education. A curricular conundrum centers on whether calling ICT a tool better enables educators to infuse ICT within their curriculum. We reviewed literature on ICT and technological tools in education from 1995 to 2008 finding an increasing number of articles that substituted tool(s) for more specific terminology. We argue given the need to understand digital technologies within constantly changing social and cultural contexts of local and global societies, it is unfortunate that digital hardware, software, and infrastructure have been reduced to being called a tool.

Citation

Arntzen, J., Krug, D. & Wen, Z. (2008). ICT literacies and the curricular conundrum of calling all complex digital technologies “Tools”. International Journal of Education and Development using ICT, 4(4), 6-14. Open Campus, The University of the West Indies, West Indies. Retrieved November 17, 2018 from .

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