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Experimental Evaluation Results of a Game Based Learning Approach for Learning Introductory Programming
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, , , , University of Greenwich, United Kingdom

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Montréal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-98-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

There is a common belief that educational video games designed to deliver conceptual and applied knowledge on programming constructs are helpful to students who are learning introductory programming. A limited number of studies have been undertaken to evaluate this premise, but the majority only provide anecdotal evidence. This paper reports on the initial results of an experimental study using 75 information technology students who played an educational game designed to support their learning of introductory programming. The results show that students’ understanding of how programming constructs work, and their algorithmic thinking abilities, were positively enhanced. Additionally the findings also suggest that the intrinsic motivation of the students to learn computer programming, and their ability to visualise programming constructs from a given problem, were increased after playing the game.

Citation

Kazimoglu, C., Kiernan, M., Bacon, L. & MacKinnon, L. (2012). Experimental Evaluation Results of a Game Based Learning Approach for Learning Introductory Programming. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2012--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 1 (pp. 636-647). Montréal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 25, 2019 from .

Keywords

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