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Experiencing the Impossible: Designing Virtual Modules in the Geosciences PROCEEDINGS

, , , New York City College of Technology, CUNY, United States ; , City College, CUNY, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-92-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

As part of a recent project entitled “Creating and Sustaining Diversity in the Geo-Sciences among Students and Teachers in the Urban and Coastal Environment of New York City” three-dimensional virtual modules will be created in Second Life to teach middle and high school students concepts of the geosciences. These modules will also be used in an undergraduate interdisciplinary course on the physics of natural disasters. We will demonstrate a completed virtual module on mountain weather, showing how students experience related simulated concepts, along with accompanying lesson plans, activities, and instructional manuals. Initial results of the use of this module will be presented, as well as our future plans for this work-in-progress project.

Citation

Lansiquot, R., Blake, R., Liou-Mark, J. & Vant-Hull, B. (2012). Experiencing the Impossible: Designing Virtual Modules in the Geosciences. In P. Resta (Ed.), Proceedings of SITE 2012--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 4142-4145). Austin, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 20, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

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These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

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Cited By

  1. Learning Geosciences in Virtual Worlds: Engaging Students in Real-World Experiences

    Reneta Lansiquot, Janet Liou-Mark & Reginald Blake, New York City College of Technology, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014 (Mar 17, 2014) pp. 658–664

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