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How to Overcome Barriers and Misconceptions of STEM Education in the United States PROCEEDINGS

, , University of Nevada, Reno, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-92-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The United States is considered to be the leader of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. Currently, American students’ performance and enthusiasm in STEM education are inadequate for the U.S. to maintain its leadership in STEM professions unless the government takes more action to motivate a new generation of U.S. students toward STEM careers. Despite coherent actions taken by the government and various institutions, the U.S. cannot ensure the production of a sufficient number of experts in STEM fields to meet its’ national and global needs. This paper starts with a deeper look at the basis of career choices by the U.S. students and the barriers and misconceptions about STEM education in the U.S.; and concludes with recommendations for how to overcome the barriers and misconceptions.

Citation

Hossain, M.M. & Robinson, M.G. (2012). How to Overcome Barriers and Misconceptions of STEM Education in the United States. In P. Resta (Ed.), Proceedings of SITE 2012--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3367-3372). Austin, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 20, 2018 from .

Keywords

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