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Educational Video Game Design to Promote Learning and Innovation Skills: Instructional Ideas for Educators PROCEEDINGS

, New Mexico State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-92-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

With the continuous recommendations to educate students for the 21st century, educators need to create educational environments for students that promote new skills in addition to learn content. Problem-based learning is one of the recommended settings to involve students in learning and practicing skills. Looking at the design of educational video games as a design problem, Hung’s 3C3R model for design problems provides a framework for promoting 21st century skills. Recommendations to use the 3C3R model for game designing in classroom settings are provided.

Citation

Trespalacios, J. (2012). Educational Video Game Design to Promote Learning and Innovation Skills: Instructional Ideas for Educators. In P. Resta (Ed.), Proceedings of SITE 2012--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2640-2645). Austin, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 20, 2018 from .

Keywords

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