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Evolution of Technology Proficiency Perceptions: Construct Validity for the Technology Proficiency Self Assessment (TPSA) Questionnaire from a Longitudinal Perspective PROCEEDINGS

, , , , University of North Texas, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-92-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This research explores the changing definition of basic technology proficiency through the history of the Technology Proficiency Self-Assessment (TPSA), a self-report instrument developed by Meg Ropp (1997, 1999). The TPSA instrument was administered to in-service teachers of a large north central Texas school district in the spring during the years of 2002 through 2011. This paper explores recent trend for the original four constructs of the TPSA to realigning into two new subscales, and considers what this realignment explains in terms of technology use today. The realignment of the subscales within the TPSA is thought to reflect a change in proficiency standards of the 21st century. The TPSA is a well-established instrument with a proven reliability, and as such, should be revised and revalidated to reflect a decade of change in technology proficiency standards.

Citation

Mayes, G., Mills, L., Christensen, R. & Knezek, G. (2012). Evolution of Technology Proficiency Perceptions: Construct Validity for the Technology Proficiency Self Assessment (TPSA) Questionnaire from a Longitudinal Perspective. In P. Resta (Ed.), Proceedings of SITE 2012--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1988-1993). Austin, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Effect of a Makerspace Training Series on Elementary and Middle School Educator Confidence Levels Toward Integrating Technology

    Jennifer Miller, University of North Texas/Birdville ISD, United States; Rhonda Christensen & Gerald Knezek, University of North Texas, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2017 (Mar 05, 2017) pp. 1015–1020

  2. Measuring 21st Century Skills in Technology Educators

    Rhonda Christensen & Gerald Knezek, University of North Texas, United States; Curby Alexander, Texas Christian University, United States; Dana Owens, University of Texas Arlington, United States; Theresa Overall, University of Maine Farmington, United States; Garry Mayes, University of North Texas, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2015 (Mar 02, 2015) pp. 1130–1136

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