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Problem-Based E-Learning in Practice: Digital Laboratories Provide Pathways from E-Science to High Schools PROCEEDINGS

, ETH Zurich, Switzerland

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-90-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Our digital age requires competent data management and critical information appraisal. This paper claims that computer science (CS) should be given the same respect in education that mathematics, physics and chemistry enjoy. Turning the computer into a digital laboratory by combining problem based learning (PBL) with E-tutoring allows students to learn CS skills by independently creating information out of raw interdisciplinary data. This technique allows a transfer of CS curriculum from the first year of university to high schools, which could free up university time for discipline-specific CS learning.

Citation

Hinterberger, H. (2011). Problem-Based E-Learning in Practice: Digital Laboratories Provide Pathways from E-Science to High Schools. In C. Ho & M. Lin (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2011--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1947-1954). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

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