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Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning and Instructional Tools: A Qualitative Study of Undergraduate Students Use of Online Tools
PROCEEDINGS

, University of San Francisco, United States

AACE Award

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-90-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to describe undergraduate students' experiences and perceptions of online courses based on interviews, observations, and online focus groups. I describe (a) motivational and learner characteristics within online classes, (b) the positive and negative aspects of online courses as experienced by students, (c) what instructors can do to improve the teaching of online courses, and (d) how undergraduate students’ perceptions of the online learning environment and the tools used affects the selection of their approach to learning.

Citation

Armstrong, D. (2011). Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning and Instructional Tools: A Qualitative Study of Undergraduate Students Use of Online Tools. In C. Ho & M. Lin (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2011--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1034-1039). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

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