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Producing Instructional Videos Through Collaborative-Action Research for People Living With an Intellectual Disability
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, , , Concordia University, Canada

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Lisbon, Portugal ISBN 978-1-880094-89-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This paper discusses a collaborative action research we conducted with a group of four interveners and five young adults with an intellectual disability, who were taking part in a government service provider program. The research aimed at developing abilities to become autonomous using video. A group of five young adults with intellectual disabilities used instructional videos on iPods for a duration of ten weeks, to try to develop the abilities needed for autonomous living such as cooking, using a stove, using a washing machine and keeping oneself safe. We will present the results from a questionnaire we designed specifically for the project, which had the sole purpose of identifying the needs of participants in terms of social integration abilities, along with the iterative process of the video production and validation. In addition this paper will provide reflections about the experience to identify directions for future research.

Citation

Davidson, A.L., Smith, J.C. & Naffi Abou Khalil, N. (2011). Producing Instructional Videos Through Collaborative-Action Research for People Living With an Intellectual Disability. In T. Bastiaens & M. Ebner (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2011--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1504-1509). Lisbon, Portugal: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 10, 2018 from .

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