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“Lucy’s always with us”: overcoming absence from school through ambient orb technology PROCEEDINGS

, Royal Children's Hospital Education Institute, Australia ; , The University of Melbourne, Australia ; , , Royal Children's Hospital Education Institute, Australia ; , The University of Melbourne, Australia ; , Royal Children's Hospital Education Institute, Australia

Global Learn, in Melbourne, Australia ISBN 978-1-880094-85-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

Abstract: When children are in hospital for a period of time and are absent from the classroom, there is a risk that ‘out of sight, out of mind’ may contribute to the disconnection with school. There is, therefore, a need for a more effective approach to the provision of education support that utilises available technologies. This proof-of-concept research is trialing the creation of a presence for hospitalised children in their school classroom through the use of broadband-enabled ambient technologies. The ‘ambient orb’ has been effective in alert teachers and schoolmates to a hospitalized child’s desire to connect with their classroom and peers, without requiring the need to establish communication.

Citation

Green, J., Vetere, F., Nisselle, A., Dang, T., Deng, P. & Strong, G. (2011). “Lucy’s always with us”: overcoming absence from school through ambient orb technology. In S. Barton, J. Hedberg & K. Suzuki (Eds.), Proceedings of Global Learn Asia Pacific 2011--Global Conference on Learning and Technology (pp. 1851-1857). Melbourne, Australia: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 20, 2018 from .

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