You are here:

Teaching Ethics through Gaming Environments: Design, Development and Research Perspectives
PROCEEDINGS

, Columbia University, United States ; , Arizona State University, United States ; , Columbia University, United States ; , University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States ; , DePaul University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-84-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

How do we design and use gaming environments to foster ethical thinking and discourse? How should we use games in classrooms and informal educational settings to support moral development? Games provide an authentic content within which to practice and experience ethical dilemmas and decision making. Nurturing ethical thinking skills is an essential part of a healthy, diverse citizenship. We need to be able to analyze, empathize, make decisions about values, identify biases, and reflect on one’s beliefs, and assess other’s perspectives as an engaged, informed citizenship within a diverse democracy such as our own (Schrier & Gibson, 2011). In this session, we seek to look beyond whether games are inherently good or bad. The experts on this panel seek to understand the potential for games to motivate and develop thought about ethics and values, and not how to use games to prescribe values.

Citation

Schrier, K., Gibson, D., Shaenfield, D., Simkins, D. & Zagal, J. (2011). Teaching Ethics through Gaming Environments: Design, Development and Research Perspectives. In M. Koehler & P. Mishra (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2011--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2238-2241). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Bogost, I. (2007). Persuasive Games. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.
  2. Gee, J.P. (2003). What VideoGames have to Teach us about Learning and Literacy. New York: PalGraveMcMillan.
  3. Salen, K., & Zimmerman, E. (2004). Rules of Play: Game Design Fundamentals. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.-2240 DASHDASH

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.