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Efficient learning in video games and implications for education
PROCEEDINGS

, Cleveland State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-84-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This study utilizes a stochastic frontier production model to examine the factors that more efficiently make students good at video games. The most notable conclusion from this analysis was that time spent playing video games during vacation weeks is much more efficient at helping a student become more competent than time spent during typical weeks. This indicates that the concentrated learning and practice time, without interruption, is more valuable than more frequent but limited amounts of time. This may have implications for formal schooling as well, relating to the debate between block scheduling and regular scheduling of classes. Particular strategies and skills in game play may also be more or less efficient according to this model.

Citation

Hamlen, K. (2011). Efficient learning in video games and implications for education. In M. Koehler & P. Mishra (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2011--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1511-1513). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 17, 2019 from .

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