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The Effects of Debriefing on Improvement of Academic Achievements and Game Skills PROCEEDINGS

, Educational Technology, Korea National University of Education, Korea (South)

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Orlando, Florida, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-83-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Many educators are interested in digital game-based learning and they anticipate it would be a useful methodology in the future education. Debriefing which is performed after the game is a most important and indispensable step for digital game-based learning. In this paper, current approaches to digital game-based learning and necessity of debriefing are studied in advance of the experiment. Then it is found out how much the debriefing affects on improvement of academic achievements and game skills. Experimental study with 5th-grade students of elementary school in Seoul is conducted using the digital game named 'Food Force'. According to the statistical analysis result of experiment data, it is verified that academic achievements and game skills are positively affected by the debriefing. The digital game-based learning would be invigorated on the basis of this study.

Citation

Son, M. (2010). The Effects of Debriefing on Improvement of Academic Achievements and Game Skills. In J. Sanchez & K. Zhang (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2010--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2186-2192). Orlando, Florida, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 16, 2018 from .

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