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MiWIT: Integrated ESL/EFL Text Analysis Tools for Content Creation in MSWord PROCEEDINGS

, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, Japan ; , Kumamoto Gakuen University, Japan ; , Kumamoto National College of Technology, Japan ; , Kumamoto University, Japan

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Orlando, Florida, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-83-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

MiWIT (“Microsoft Word Integrated Text Analysis Tools”), provides a set of innovative text-analysis tools for second-language learning, developed for the Microsoft Word platform. These tools can free ESL (English as a Second) teachers from the need to constantly switch between discrete software packages and MS Word. In order to prepare teaching materials, they are able to work as follows: 1) type text (and/or copy and paste from the Internet) into MS Word; 2) analyze this text using text analysis tools to check the difficulty level, such as text length, word frequency, lexical difficulty, etc.; 3) while remaining in MS Word, text can be corrected or emended as indicated by MiWIT tools. Such procedures are typically (in the case of MS Word) cumbersome, especially when documents include charts and images. Henceforth, they can avoid annoying procedures, as MiWIT allows them to conveniently and rapidly perform a series of operations for ESL content development without leaving MS Word.

Citation

Matsuno, R., Tsutsumi, Y., Matsuo, K. & Gilbert, R. (2010). MiWIT: Integrated ESL/EFL Text Analysis Tools for Content Creation in MSWord. In J. Sanchez & K. Zhang (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2010--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 255-260). Orlando, Florida, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 15, 2018 from .

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