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Digital Divide: Does the Internet Speak Your Language? PROCEEDINGS

, Teachers College, Columbia University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Toronto, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-81-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This paper reports the issue of Internet language divide. Background data suggest that English remains to be the Internet language despite the fact that only a small percentage of the world’s population speaks English as a first language. The potential problem is that there is a disproportion between the number of non-English speakers and number of non-English websites. The result of English being the dominant language on the Web has created a digital language divide between the English and non-English Internet users. Possible solutions to this problem include low-cost applications and software in user’s native languages, machine translations, and translation services.

Citation

Lu, L. (2010). Digital Divide: Does the Internet Speak Your Language?. In J. Herrington & C. Montgomerie (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2010--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 4022-4025). Toronto, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 13, 2018 from .

Keywords

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